Category Archives: Exhibitions

“They rejected brushes and pencils in favor of drafting tools and photography”

The Art Institute of Chicago is currently hosting an exhibition titled “Avant-Garde Art in Everyday Life” which follows six artists working in Eastern Europe primarily from the 1920’s and 1930’s in the world of design. As the exhibition overview tells, these artists “rejected brushes and pencils in favor of drafting tools and photography,” choosing not to create fine art, but to bring their work to the people through posters, books, magazines, and even office supplies and stationary. The six artists are similar and at times their work overlaps in space, style and intent, but I found the second half of the exhibit – that focusing on the work of Latvian Gustav Klutsis, Russian El Lissitzky and German John Heartfield – to be the more interesting. Continue reading

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Calatrava’s Wings

Burke Brise Soleil

I used the opportunity of a Friday holiday to take a day trip up to Milwaukee. Although Wisconsin is known for its beer and cheese (and it has a lower sales tax), the raison-d’etre of the journey was to see the art museum (and the art contained therein).

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Supper at Emmaus, Caravaggio (1601)

Caravaggio, Supper at Emmaus (1601)

Supper at Emmaus (1601), Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Source: Wikipedia Commons)

There has been quite a bit of hubbub recently about a new painting at the Art Institute of Chicago. The museum is exhibiting Supper at Emmaus (1601) by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio which depicts the moment when Jesus, upon returning to the earth after his crucifixion and resurrection, reveals himself to two apostles. The painting is on loan from the National Gallery of London to which the AIC loaned its work The Crucifixion (1627) by Francisco de Zurbarán. Now The Crucifixion is a fine work, but we may have gotten the better deal here; Caravaggio is a very well known and well loved Italian Baroque painter and Supper at Emmaus is counted among his very best works. And since masterpiece is a term oft thrown about for this work, I was eager to see it.

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